Five things to watch for in the Canadian business world in the coming week

Five things to watch for in the Canadian business world in the coming week: FINDING ORDER The New Democrats have claimed that Justin Trudeau’s government is putting its immigration agenda ahead of getting a…

Five things to watch for in the Canadian business world in the coming week

Five things to watch for in the Canadian business world in the coming week:

FINDING ORDER

The New Democrats have claimed that Justin Trudeau’s government is putting its immigration agenda ahead of getting a handle on a ballooning deficit. Following a report that the government does not have a plan to balance the budget, New Democrat MP Nathan Cullen warned on Monday that the government must be “willing to stand up to employers, banks and the corporate machine” that wants to “force Canadians out of their jobs.”

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ZEEP-O-RAMA

Caroline Mulroney is the daughter of former prime minister Brian Mulroney. With her father behind her as the chair of the federal Conservative Party, Mulroney is running for the party leadership. But Mulroney’s one defining trait in the race is that she doesn’t care about fundraising. Instead, the media and punditry have geared up to focus on the technicalities of her platform, what she said about her father and whether the media over-reports on her every move.

TIGHTEN THE SCREWS

Will Toronto Star owner Torstar Corp. reach an agreement with unionized employees at The Toronto Star and The National Post? Or will the company impose new contracts on the unions, which have been without a contract since May? The Star accounts for about a third of Torstar’s profits. It’s a small but significant expense that gets spent on wages and benefits – lessening the company’s resources for other areas. That’s a continuing challenge to Torstar’s management, which has come under fire for attempts to significantly cut costs. For a sense of just how big Torstar is – circulation figures for the Star’s daily and Sunday editions on Thursday were the lowest they’ve been in 70 years.

FLAT BOTTOM

Argentina’s stock market has been hammered since its government changed the fiscal outlook and introduced unpopular tax hikes earlier this year. Last week the company said it was reviewing options for the economy, including a new currency regime and possible intervention to support the peso. Analysts warned this year’s tax increases and other changes are likely to weigh on what remains of Argentina’s economy.

LITTLER GOING TO GET YOUNG

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This two-week heavy schedule has some observers concerned that Toronto Mayor John Tory is changing the impression that he isn’t fully invested in the city’s economy.

Trade secrets

Journalists shouldn’t talk to me. Actually they shouldn’t talk to other journalists.

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