Ford announces plan to make all of its cars ‘Made in the USA’ by 2030

In a statement Thursday evening, Ford announced a new arrangement with Intel to ensure that its automotive and electric vehicles used Intel’s FinFET processors. Those are chips that operate at a level of precision…

Ford announces plan to make all of its cars ‘Made in the USA’ by 2030

In a statement Thursday evening, Ford announced a new arrangement with Intel to ensure that its automotive and electric vehicles used Intel’s FinFET processors. Those are chips that operate at a level of precision to reduce power consumption. (Intel is already a supplier of Intel’s XMM 8000 modem technology, which helps transfer data between mobile devices and cellular networks.) In a release, Ford said that using Intel’s chips will “deliver reliable, high-performance chips that meet our system requirements and meet our long-term vision of a 100 percent U.S.-made car in 2030.”

Ford has long argued that a number of the components needed for a car’s design and production are all produced in the United States, including not only vehicle components, but also the world’s suppliers. On Wednesday, the company also announced plans to open a plant in Mexico, which would be the company’s seventh assembly plant outside the United States. (Other assembly plants are in China, India, Thailand, Indonesia, Argentina and Turkey.)

“Ford will continue to invest in the country’s auto sector as a major industry supplier, which is why we chose to open a U.S. manufacturing plant in Brownsville, Texas, and we continue to support a long-term auto manufacturing goal of 65 percent of global auto sales made in the U.S.,” according to a release from Ford.

The automotive industry is a hub for innovation and inventions, but as with so many industries, jobs are of the most concern these days. Ford’s latest move seems to be an answer to that call, but there are others, like President Trump’s oft-stated concern for production and manufacturing jobs. The president, who has spoken often about the importance of American manufacturing, has made it clear that he is sensitive to the idea that outsourcing may mean companies are “winning but American workers are losing,” as he told a vehicle assembler in July.

It’s an idea that Ford didn’t shy away from in its statement. “It’s critical that we commit to bringing every vehicle segment produced in the U.S. back home,” it said. “America’s automotive industry is unique because it has enabled over 200 million small, medium and large U.S. families to go to work each day and buy their family’s first car.”

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